Interview with Jack Snyder 

Interviewed by Erin Alston on November 9,2000 

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH: 

 

Jack Snyder is a married man who was Director of Operations for a company in Ohio. He moved to Florida when he found out that he had emphysema, and then moved to North Carolina when he was accepted on the waiting list at Duke.  Jack was diagnosed with end stage emphysema.  Pre-transplant, Snyder was at 11% lung capacity and was on oxygen 24 hours a day. He was diagnosed 18 years ago, but wasnít transplanted until December 8th, 1998. He only waited about four months on the waiting list.  At the time of the interview, Snyder had been out for almost two years and was in late second rejection, but he was very active, exercising every day.

 

Excerpts from Transcript

 

Excerpt 1 | Excerpt 2 | Excerpt 3 | Excerpt 4 | Excerpt 5

 

Excerpt 1

 

Background: 

Jack was discussing his medications when one of his alarm clocks goes off in the background, signaling it's time to take his medication.

 

Excerpt:

So I have these little clocks.  Iíve got cooking clocks that I got out at Lechterís and I set two of them for everything that I have to do. I also got a special checklist because if you miss taking your medication, it can be very serious. And it has happened.

 

Return to top

 

Excerpt 2

 

Background: 

Jack is talking about heartburn and how that can be a problem for transplant recipients. He had special surgery for his heartburn, but is now in late second rejection and is talking about that.

 

Excerpt:

Everyone basically from the time you start, get your lung transplant, the average person doesnít make it more than five years. About 47% ... donít make it.  When you have a second rejection they say that that doubles your chance for chronic rejection.  Of course, chronic rejection, there is no cure.

 

Return to top

 

Excerpt 3

 

Background: 

EA: . When you got evaluated and you found out you had the emphysema, did that get you to quit smoking when you got evaluated?

 

Excerpt:

JS: You know the funny thing is, quitting smoking is the easiest thing I ever did. When I did it. In fact I think, frankly, and my wife says the same thing.

 

Return to top

 

Excerpt 4

 

Background: 

EA:  Letís talk about your health and your life after the transplant.

 

Excerpt:

JS:  Well, this is where you really need to talk to my wife almost because sheíll tell you that Iím not the same person. Iím not. I enjoy doing things Iíve never enjoyed before. I do a lot more. Iím not restricted whatsoever, even though when I said my breathingís at about 65-66%of what a normal person my age. That is plenty. I can do just about anything I want to. If I want to walk up a hill, I may be a little tired when I get there, but I can do it. Attitude is so different. Things that used to be, I donít worry about things basically. I used to worry about everything.

 

Return to top

 

Excerpt 5

 

Background: 

EA:  So, anything else you want to talk about that I didnít mention?

 

Excerpt:

JS: The only thing is that somehow, someway the word's got to get out to more families, particularly the young families. If youíre a young mother and you lose a child, donít hesitate to give the organs to another child, because thereís many of them out there waiting. You go out here to Duke Center for Living and watch these kids. Watch anyone, youíll see it. Youíll see it.  Itís pretty tough.

 

Top of page | Fall 2000 Interviews | Home

 

 

horizontal rule

For more information, contact Dr. Mary Jo Festle, Associate Professor of History at Elon University.

Email: festle@elon.edu

This page last updated 11/24/02