Five Discussion Questions:

Question #1    At the present time, Elon students who receive an F in a course as a result of an academic honor code violation do not have any explanation of that grade on their transcript.  Other schools (including UNC-CH) have started using a grade of XF when a student receives an honor code F.  Would the use of an XF grade at Elon deter students from cheating/plagiarizing, etc.?  Should students be presented with a way to remove the X from their transcripts (e.g., attendance in an “honor course”)?

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Question #2  Elon is investigating whether it should subscribe to a plagiarism-detection service.  One such service, TurnItIn, requires students to submit papers electronically and then it checks papers for possible plagiarism, returning the paper and the plagiarism report to the instructor.  Should Elon invest in such a service?  What would be gained?  What would be lost?

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 Question #3   What can instructors do to help students better understand the importance of having an honor code and acting with integrity?

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 Question #4   A friend asks to borrow a paper you’ve just written in a class you’re taking together.  The friend wants to see an example of how a paper might be organized, but you’re concerned that this person might take liberties and use some of your paper without giving you credit for doing the original work.  You would prefer not to share your work.  What do you say or do in response to this comment by your friend:  “Hey, can I borrow your paper tonight before you turn it in tomorrow?  It’s awesome that you got it done so early.”

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Question #5   Several universities around the country will automatically dismiss any student who violates the honor code.  There are no second chances.  The consequences for dishonest actions are clear.  Should Elon adopt this policy?  If students knew the consequences were really final and were enforced, would students be less likely to think of cheating as an option?

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